Category Archives: Courtly Love

Pictures of chivalry.

Rollo and Fabius Maximus both have new posts up with disturbing images.  Check out Rollo’s post Unconscious Contempt, and Fabius Maximus’ post Women are driving America into the future.  As you click over and view these disturbing images, keep in … Continue reading

Posted in Chivalry, Courtly Love, Fabius Maximus, Linkage, Rollo Tomassi, Turning a blind eye, Ugly Feminists | 67 Comments

You say Jesus, they think Lancelot.

Commenter Robert gives an example of how modern Christians can’t conceive of Christianity separate from what we call chivalry (courtly love): I’m not clued up on chivalry, but Jesus loving us enough to die for us seems like chivalry to … Continue reading

Posted in Chivalry, Courtly Love | 69 Comments

Confusing history with literature.

One of Vox Day’s readers argued: As Dalrock has explained, all that cultural bomb-throwers have to do is to borrow from the Satanic inversion that is chivalry, that puts women in the place of Jesus. Vox objected, responding: That’s not … Continue reading

Posted in Chivalry, Courtly Love, Vox Day | 236 Comments

Chivalry is the word that expresses that ideal.

One of the frequent criticisms I’ve received with my writing on chivalry is that I’m using the term incorrectly. The argument is that chivalry is merely a code of martial honor, and that the ideals of reverence of women, idolization … Continue reading

Posted in Chivalry, Courtly Love, Vox Day | 47 Comments

An earnest defense of John MacArthur’s chivalry.

French poets, in the eleventh century, discovered or invented, or were the first to express, that romantic species of passion which English poets were still writing about in the nineteenth. They effected a change which has left no corner of … Continue reading

Posted in Beth Moore, Chivalry, Complementarian, Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, Courtly Love, Desiring God, Dr. Douglass Moo, Dr. John Piper, Dr. Wayne Grudem, Envy, Feminist Territory Marking, Feminists, Pastor John MacArthur, Pulpit & Pen, Women's Studies | 130 Comments