He almost had a masculine thought.

After seeing How To Prepare Our Sons for the Matriarchy over at The Good Men Project, I decided to poke around a bit and see what else they offered.  While the nameplate declares that it is “The conversation no one else is having”, it is standard issue SJW content.  Most of the pieces are by women, for women, and about women.  It is a truly breathtaking example of feminist territory marking.

But even worse, the odd piece that is written by a man is effeminate melodrama.  In My Tribute to Mount Washing Machine, Shannon Carpenter writes about his fears of laundry inadequacy:

We have just begun, and the journey is long.  I think of the fathers before me and hope I stack up….

I drop my load and grab Carl, a white plush polar bear. I tell him my laundry issues as I stroke his comforting polyester fur. Carl gets me.

He reminds me that my climb is not yet over. I must hurry. The toddler is almost done not napping.

In another post author Stuart Motola describes a horrifying experience, where for a very brief moment he stopped emoting like a woman and started to feel a strange temptation to think like a man.  He writes in Guns and Consciousness that the day started off like any other, with him clutching his pearls:

The questions came at me. How do I stay safe? How do I keep my son safe? Is it time to move abroad? When will this stop? What can I do? How can I… ? And on and on…

I felt a rupture in my chest. A deep split in myself.

I looked around my home and then out my window. I am safe, here and now, I told myself.No shooters anywhere in sight.

I took a deep breath. I could land in my breath. Only there, for now. Nowhere else.

This was when the bad, no good, masculine thoughts started to creep into his head.  He was terrified.  This had never happened before!

…foreign thoughts had infiltrated my psyche. Thoughts of getting a gun…

I knew better. To imagine being “the good guy with a gun” was more of an attempt to stay safe than a reality of being in the right place at the right time with the right training to shoot down “a bad guy with a gun.” If I was serious, I would need to train consistently, shoot weekly, maintain a firearm, and even then, I’d likely never come to this imagined moment.

Luckily the thought of having to master something manly jarred him back into his senses, and he realized the whole thing was just another example of him getting worked up over nothing.

Related: Shooting an AR 15 made him emotional, and then the internet was mean to him.

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This entry was posted in Feminist Territory Marking, Good Men Project, Guns, Manliness, Social Justice Warriors, You can't make this stuff up. Bookmark the permalink.

46 Responses to He almost had a masculine thought.

  1. Hmm says:

    Oh my! So much soyboy gathered together in one place.

  2. Kevin says:

    There are no feminine home chores that are complicated. Many are hard work and time intensive but none are challenging. My wife is bright and chores are mundane. She does them for love. Men pretending that their is something cognitively complicated about chores are one step beyond pedastalizing and into something more ridiculous.

    When a man tells me he is scared of guns in the home I don’t try to pursuade him – I accept his assessment that he is incompetent and emotionally unfit and should not have a gun. Maybe not knives either.

  3. earl says:

    Poor guy…he almost got off the feminist plantation and it scared him.

  4. honeycomb says:

    Earl ..

    It’s scary out their all by your lonesome .. scary I tell you .. he’s the lucky one .. /s

  5. Ben Mavet Who says:

    I clicked over to TGMP. I felt my testosterone drop precipitously in the first five minutes. If I’d spent anymore time reading there I’d probably be tempted to paint my hair blue, drink a soy latte and go join a pointless protest.

    Ironically, even though they’re soyboy wimps they were probably not beat up enough as children. Now it is too late for them although I do confess to the urge to give it a try anyway.

  6. javaloco says:

    You’d never heard of TGMP? I found, via some manosphere blog, and disavowed a few years ago.

  7. Larry G says:

    Omg, that was hilarious! Poor Stuart with an almost-thought that remotely might have had festivals. Can’t have that shit, can we?

  8. Gary Eden says:

    Makes you wonder what they’re putting in the water these days.

  9. Jean says:

    That “Guns and Consciousness” essay is strange. I used to teach English, so I know all the words he’s using. It’s just that they don’t make much sense to me the way he puts them together. “Separate from yourself in times of fear”? In times of fear, he should probably hike up his panties and run and let someone else handle it.

  10. Lost Patrol says:

    The articles on that site actually cause pain.

    Also from Stuart Motola’s article:

    Help me build a tribe of 10,000 passionate self-relationship warriors

    I KNEW they were organized! Senator Tim “my primary role is to be Hillary Clinton’s right hand person” Kaine is probably a chieftain.

  11. Red Pill Latecomer says:

    I live in a condo with a washer/dryer. I’ve always done my own laundry. It’s nothing. I can’t imagine mentally struggling over “laundry issues.”

  12. Anonymous Reader says:

    No surprise to me that the Good Mangina Project has continued to slide further into female dominance and thus an infinite variation of man-bashing and masculinity bashing. It is worth remembering that the founder of GMP invited women in, and eventually was kicked out, of the organization.

    Recent events lead me to a conclusion, and I will beat this drum from time to time:

    any organization that is easy to join, that fails to limit women’s authority, will in time become dominated by women.
    I guess I should copypasta this comment to the “weak men” thread, just for completeness.

    Gary Eden
    Makes you wonder what they’re putting in the water these days.

    I realize that’s rhetorical, but the actual answer is “a lot of things”. Estrogen and estrogenic compounds such as bisphenols and parabens, for example.One can get a pretty good argument going with a feminist environmentalist by suggesting that “estrogen pollution” of rivers is a problem. Whatever the source, it’s known that men in the industrialized world have lower T than men in the same countries 30 years ago. Likewise sperm counts are down. Some of this is surely sedentary living, but not all of it by any means.

    So, yes, “it’s in the water”, and it’s in many of the bottles containing the water. No joke. And “soyboy” is not a joke either.

    @Jean
    I’m not making the time to read the essay right now, but possibly he accidentally referred to disassociation, an amped up version of “this can’t be happening to me!” thinking that many people go through in a crisis.

    I agree that this man should in no way be anywhere near any firearms.

  13. Anonymous Reader says:

    Lost Patrol
    The articles on that site actually cause pain.

    Yes. It was not always that bad, too.
    Places such as GMP are why I use phrases like “The stupid! It burns!” very sparingly…only when apt. It fits here.

  14. Anonymous Reader says:

    RPL
    I can’t imagine mentally struggling over “laundry issues.”

    Hmmm, consider the stress of accidentally washing a “cold only” work dress on “warm” and thereby shrinking or otherwise damaging it…then hearing about it over and over from your “till death do us part”. Now imagine she’s earning the majority of the money.

    Speculation: male feminists such as found at the GMP are men who have “mommy issues”. They fear the displeasure of Mommy.

  15. Anon says:

    You’d never heard of TGMP?

    It is quite a coincidence that the acronym sounds like ‘The Gimp’.

  16. I had no struggles doing laundry even when I was still mostly blue pill. I think this is all an odd form of virtue signalling. Pretending men aren’t capable of the tasks that woman traditionally do, to prove that they are “woke,” or something.

  17. Pingback: He almost had a masculine thought. | Reaction Times

  18. Sharkly says:

    There are no feminine home chores that are complicated.

    I remember my father, a brilliant engineer, telling me about Isaac Singer; “Making a machine that could sew was simple, and had been done before, but making a sewing machine that a woman could run, that was pure genius.”

  19. Scott says:

    I had no struggles doing laundry even when I was still mostly blue pill. I think this is all an odd form of virtue signalling. Pretending men aren’t capable of the tasks that woman traditionally do, to prove that they are “woke,” or something.

    It’s white knighting/lift chasing.

    In one of my last assignments on active duty, one of the instructors I worked with used to describe his relationship to his wife this way in front of the classroom constantly. Basically she was near-omniscient in her abilities to run the finances, fix things, tell him where to go/be. It was quite grating.

  20. John jay r says:

    Get ready for the matriarchy. Afterall, they’ve worked their way up to 5 percent of annual patents granted (companies falling all over themselves to credit a female got them from 3 to 5 percent) Time to step aside and let them change the world with their creative genius. Innovate, innovate, innovate! Our better half invented Kevlar afterall. Step aside boys.

  21. Tim Pollard says:

    If you didn’t know how I could see how you would have trouble figuring it out without any instructions. It’s on the same sort of scale as mixing the oil for and then starting a two-stroke motor, or unboxing and plugging in a new DVD player.

    There’s a certain class of people who have a panic attack when faced with putting on a load of washing, or starting a whipper-snipper, or setting up a DVD player, rather than just finding someone who already knows how and is willing to spend ten minutes explaining to them, or, even easier, finding a video online.

    Where it gets different though is that these guys is that usually such people complain that the device they are trying to use is badly engineered because they couldn’t find and follow basic instructions on its use. Instead these men take it as proof that their wives, and generally, by extension, all women, are somehow super-human.

  22. Spike says:

    The way women go on about housework!
    One would think they still have to wash filthy laundry (that once happened when men worked hard labor before mechanization) by hand, beating it on a rock in the nearest river. Cooking – once not long ago, wood had to be chopped, stoves stoked and carefully adjusted for heat before actual cooking could be done. Chickens had to be beheaded, plucked and gutted; beasts had to be shot and butchered.Vegetables had to be grown. Women of old did these things without complaint, knowing that at
    least they were spared work in the mine, away from the flailing machine, the forge or other far more unpleasant job her husband, father, brother or son had.
    Modern Western women would have to be history’s greatest ingrates.

  23. Prompt Critical says:

    One of the underappreciated but extremely pernicious effects of the increasingly delayed age of marriage is that men spend more time living on their own and have a much better idea of how simple most traditionally feminine housekeeping tasks actually are. A man who marries at 19 or 20 has basically no experience running a home on his own, so he’d presumably be more likely to believe his wife (and society) when they tell him how onerous her job is. It’s much more difficult to justify the idea of working eight hours a day to support a stay-at-home wife when you actually understand how quick and easy the tasks are.

    On a semi-related aside, I’d recommend at some point making time to just watch your significant other doing routine household chores. Women have what is (to my guy brain) an amazing incapacity to do things sequentially or in logical order, which makes even simple tasks herculean. It’s fascinating to consider the implications of this with the mass entry of women into the American workforce. How much productivity is flushed down this drain every year?

  24. feeriker says:

    @Spike

    Modern Western women would have to be history’s greatest ingrates.

    It’s actually hilarious to listen to them ceaselessly bitch and whine about domestic tasks that almost none of them can do and that they WOULDN’T do even if they could. The fact that they actually think that these tasks are onerous proves that they’ve never done them.

    On a semi-related aside, I’d recommend at some point making time to just watch your significant other doing routine household chores. Women have what is (to my guy brain) an amazing incapacity to do things sequentially or in logical order, which makes even simple tasks herculean.

    THIS, to the power of 1000. But remember: women LOVE the drama in struggling, flailing, failing, and being the object of pity/sympathy. DO NOT EVEN THINK ABOUT making their tasks easier, let alone solving their problem for them, thus robbing them of the attention and martyrdom. (Re-)Watch this classic video for an illustration of the concept.

  25. John James R. says:

    “It’s much more difficult to justify the idea of working eight hours a day to support a stay-at-home wife when you actually understand how quick and easy the tasks are.”

    Good point. Lucky guy who only works 8 hours and can support a SAH wife.

    “There are no feminine home chores that are complicated. Many are hard work and time intensive but none are challenging.”

    Nope, not hard work at all and not time intensive either. Not even close to ‘time intensive’ That’s the FI coming out of your mouth.

    We’ve all done housework by now. Routine dishwashing, laundry, cleaning and vacuuming are very easy, satisfying tasks. I find that cleaning up and sorting things out is actually very nice, mindless, easy ritual. I enjoy it and see it as the easiest part of my weekend by far. The gym and a personal project are when things require effort. It feels great to have those household things done and live in the cleanliness. Besides, what other option is there? Not do those things?

    Should people be lauded for tying their shoes and putting on deodorant too? Shampooing their hair?

    The fact that women have not only bullied the culture into viewing 45 minutes a day of pleasant routine as Herculean sacrifice only shows how totally unchallenged they have been for 50 years now.

    I’ve put dishes in the dishwasher, pressed buttons and taken them out, even put them in the cupboard!!!! You can’t fool me on this stuff.

  26. John James R. says:

    “It’s fascinating to consider the implications of this with the mass entry of women into the American workforce.”

    Especially corporate America where they can branch off into HR and PR and whatever other department that is just them having meetings in which they discuss past and future meetings.

    And the onslaught is just getting started, looking at the educational trends.

    I’ve been temping for a long stretch in a warehouse, staying home to be near my sick father. I work with a bunch of single moms. We have comically simple tasks/expectations but I’ve seen them burn up tens of thousands of dollars by chatting, ducking any unsavory task, stretching out their breaks, milking simple tasks to gin up their overtime opportunities, call in sick on the busiest days to avoid them. It’s pitiful. Just this small crew has cost the company a hundred grand in wasted cash.

    What’s the best way to bet/invest against Corporate America as a whole via stocks, funds, bonds etc.?

  27. Chairman Miaow says:

    Since my wife left I have had to do my own job (running a company, employing people, a 60-80 hour a week commitment), bring up 4 older kids (youngest 12 when it happened), be responsible for their ongoing education (at home) and career choices/planning, and to run the household (with their help).

    That means cooking, cleaning, laundry, shopping etc, and do you know what? I really don’t understand what she actually did. Yes, I saw her ‘working hard’ etc but I can do her job and mine and take on the further tasks too, and we’ve never done so much. She didn’t constantly complain outright but her whole demeanor and body language was that the work was repetitive and boring and like some sort of purgatory. She didn’t really help the kids to help her or to even learn to enjoy these things and do them well and thankfully. It sometimes seemed that she was using the tasks to fuel her own belief in her martyrdom and also as a buffer to not engage with anyone or hand anything of value on.

    I actually enjoy all the tasks, they have helped us get on with our lives and been a source of joy and learning (cooking for example).

    We really are deep in a war against humanity and feminism is one of the key weapons used against all of us.

    The chief way this weapon works is that many woman are extremely easily seduced by dissatisfaction whilst at the same time not being able or willing to have the gratitude or the imagination to understand how good things are. Out of control narcissism leads them to project their dissatisfaction onto good things and then the cancer just grows and grows, one household at a time, like a plague,like a slow genocide.

  28. feministhater says:

    Okay this made me laugh! The very thought of having to defend his home and family turns him to mush. His better half better get busy..

    Thanks for going over there are sacrificing your own T-levels Dalrock. I couldn’t stomach the stench.

  29. feeriker says:

    The chief way this weapon works is that many woman are extremely easily seduced by dissatisfaction whilst at the same time not being able or willing to have the gratitude or the imagination to understand how good things are.

    I’ll admit to feeling a deliciously perverse sense of satisfaction in watching them suffer after they’ve destroyed the world of comfort and care they were privileged enough to enjoy, but couldn’t bring themselves to be grateful for. Eventually the 4-watt bulb that passes for their cerebral cortex lights up and they realize how self-destructively stupid they’ve been, but of course they’re too full of selfish pride to ever actually admit it.

    Every wise woman buildeth her house: but the foolish plucketh it down with her hands.

    ~ Proverbs 14:1 (KJV)

  30. Clarence says:

    For a brief time the Good Mangina Project had a more varied political stance: somehow over the next two years after I wrote this Tom was forced out and the Feminists took total control and it’s been totally useless to men ever since. https://goodmenproject.com/ethics-values/duke-lacrosse-metanarratives-the-telephone-effect-and-the-falsely-accused/

  31. earl says:

    I think women complain more that they have to be a helpmate to a man rather than doing those particular tasks. After all feminism told her she is special enough to not need a man.

  32. Oscar says:

    @feeriker

    The fact that they actually think that these tasks are onerous proves that they’ve never done them.

    Actually, what it proves is that they’ve never done anything truly difficult, or complex. If the most difficult, complex task you’d ever completed was a load of laundry (with a modern laundering equipment), you’d also think the task onerous.

    Ease and difficulty, simplicity and complexity, are relative terms determined by experience.

  33. Gunner Q says:

    RPL
    “I can’t imagine mentally struggling over “laundry issues.””

    My last laundry panic attack was when I returned to the laundromat to discover I’d left my pepper spray in my cargo pants’ pocket. Thank God they didn’t call the fire dept.

  34. farmlegend says:

    “I actually enjoy all the tasks, they have helped us get on with our lives and been a source of joy and learning (cooking for example).”

    I’m an older dude on this board, 61. Most of my friends are old divorced guys. Darn near every one of ’em is a decent cook. Some, damn good.
    Guys from my dad’s generation, not so much. Hmmm.

    And, honestly, close to none of the women I’ve known/dated/married were very skilled in the kitchen. Ah, western civ, circa 2018.

  35. Anon says:

    feeriker,

    Eventually the 4-watt bulb that passes for their cerebral cortex lights up and they realize how self-destructively stupid they’ve been, but of course they’re too full of selfish pride to ever actually admit it.

    Why would women suddenly be able to connect cause and effect?

  36. Anon says:

    Prompt Critical,

    One of the underappreciated but extremely pernicious effects of the increasingly delayed age of marriage is that men spend more time living on their own and have a much better idea of how simple most traditionally feminine housekeeping tasks actually are.

    Why is this ‘pernicious’? The fact that a single man realizes that he needs a wife even less than he thought is an example of greater transparency and better information available to a decision-maker.

    When you need to conceal information in order to falsely keep a woman’s perceived value inflated in order to fob them off onto deceived men, then your own value system is wrong.

    You sound like a Republican feminist.

    Rather, a woman who wishes to marry should have to work to find new ways to bring value to the marriage, otherwise she isn’t a compelling alternative to the other choices available to a man.

  37. Prompt Critical says:

    Why is this ‘pernicious’? The fact that a single man realizes that he needs a wife even less than he thought is an example of greater transparency and better information available to a decision-maker.

    “Why is something that leads to men choosing to delay or avoid marriage pernicious?” is hopefully a rhetorical question. I’m not saying the decision to do so is irrational or unjustified in the current environment – quite the opposite, it’s an entirely logical and understandable reaction to the incentives we’ve created for both genders. Nevertheless it absolutely is socially corrosive for a huge variety of reasons, and I am not an accelerationist so I really don’t want to see everything burn.

    Rather, a woman who wishes to marry should have to work to find new ways to bring value to the marriage, otherwise she isn’t a compelling alternative to the other choices available to a man.

    Oh good point. All it takes to fix everything is for women to start prioritizing long-term happiness over short-term validation, overcoming decades of conformist social programming, inability to learn vicariously, and ingrained feminine solipsism.

    I’m glad you’re bringing realistic suggestions here.

  38. Anon says:

    Prompt Critical,

    You are still saying that exposing the truth about women might lead to fewer men sustaining interest in marriage, so the truth about women should be concealed from men.

    Lying to men for what you believe to be ‘the greater good’ is still misandry.

    Nevertheless it absolutely is socially corrosive for a huge variety of reasons,

    Gee, maybe you should think of ways to force women to become more suitable for marriage, if you want there to be more marriages (and fewer divorces).

  39. Prompt Critical says:

    You are still saying that exposing the truth about women might lead to fewer men sustaining interest in marriage […]

    Yes.

    […] so the truth about women should be concealed from men.

    No.

  40. Frank K says:

    Women have what is (to my guy brain) an amazing incapacity to do things sequentially or in logical order, which makes even simple tasks herculean.

    This.

  41. feeriker says:

    Why would women suddenly be able to connect cause and effect?

    It rarely ever happens, but whenever it does it’s always the result of intolerable, self-inflicted pain that forces them into an awareness that they have only themselves to thank for it. Now as for getting them to actually admit to anyone else that their predicament is their own fault … never gonna happen.

  42. Pingback: Won’t someone call out the weight lifters? | Dalrock

  43. Sven says:

    How to prepare black folks for slavery.

    See what I did there.

  44. Pingback: Charlize Theron has us trapped. | Dalrock

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