Top 10 most annoying parents

Dr Helen (here and here) and Captain Capitalism both have recent posts on parents being incensed when their poorly behaved children aren’t welcome.  They have inspired me to write my own post on the topic.

My wife and I were married for 10 years before we had our first child.  During that time whenever we witnessed out of control kids the standard refrain was you’ll understand when you have kids.  When our daughter was about three we were at a restaurant when a mother (passively) sent her 5 year old daughter to our table to investigate the toys our daughter was quietly playing with.  I must have given her a look, because her comment to me was you’ll understand when you have more than one child.  Now that we have two, I can honestly say that I still don’t allow our daughter to join other diners at their table or even stand in the booth and turn around to stare at the family on the other side.  Obviously I can’t guarantee that I wouldn’t change my view on this if I had a few more kids, but I’m pretty confident this wouldn’t be the case.  Either way, I’ve compiled a list of the top 10 most annoying types of parents for your reading enjoyment.  I haven’t assigned them numbers, because really they are all winners.  Feel free to add any I’ve missed in the comments section.

The world is my babysitter.  These parents range from the ones who pretend not to notice as their young child joins you at your table at the restaurant (often begging for food) to the ones who actively encourage their children to attach on to you while they are shopping or perhaps reading a novel on a long flight.  When my wife worked for a department store one mother told her young son to talk with the nice lady while she went about her browsing.  The child was learning his ABCs, and was singing a song to help him remember.  By the time his mother returned he was singing a slightly different version of the song:  K is for cookie, that’s good enough for me!  Cookie cookie cookie starts with K!  His oblivious mother of course was the epitome of etiquette:  Now thank the nice lady!  Another great trick is to teach the child foisted on you some new form of bodily function humor.  It doesn’t have to be creative;  barfing sounds or armpit farts will do just fine.  Then tell the delighted child go show mommy and/or daddy!

Don’t worry, I have a gun. I don’t have anything against children at shooting ranges, so long as they are safe and under the control of their parents.  My father started taking me shooting when I was in the third grade.  It was serious business and I was always under his control.  Fortunately, irresponsible parents at shooting ranges are very rare, and no range-master worth his salt will let this kind of thing get by.  I was a member of a sportsman’s club many years ago which had a private self policed range.  It was out on the prairie and had a combination lock on the gate.  One day I was sighting my rifle in when a truck pulled up with a 10 year old boy riding on the back bumper.  The father then proceeded to hand his hyperactive son all manner of uncased firearms for the boy to put on the shooting tables.  I don’t know what happened next because I gathered my stuff and left.  Another time at a public range an unattended young teen set up shop at the station immediately to my left.  I was in a right handed station and his was a lefty one.  This wouldn’t have been a problem if he was shooting a lefty rifle, but he proceeded to drop hot brass down my collar with his right handed rifle.  I mentioned this to him several times, and each time he stopped long enough for me to let my guard down before starting back up.  I’ve since found a better policed range.

What crash?  I didn’t hear anything.  Whenever you see unattended children running around in public, wait a few minutes for the inevitable crashing sound and/or blood curdling scream.  Then look for the only people who didn’t seem to notice.  The ones who didn’t turn their heads or even wince are the parents.  Often times these parents fear that their children won’t be able to achieve the velocity required to create a spectacular enough crash, and equip their children with roller skates disguised as sneakers.

I couldn’t find a sitter.  These parents are most often found bringing their young children with them to wholly inappropriate movies.  When my wife and I watched Saw 37 (or maybe it was 38) there were more children under 10 in the theater than there were adults.  I also distinctly remember watching a horror movie about an evil tooth fairy with 4 and 5 year old children in the audience.  Yes, I know, I’ll understand if I have more kids.  Or not.

The world will now stop while my 4 year old ponders the menu.  I’ve never been a waiter, so my only direct experience with this is being behind these parents at a fast food restaurant.  Little Billy has ordered the same thing the last 20 times they were here, but his parents want to make sure he takes his time ordering to get the most out of his dining experience.  Crucial to the process is that he not consider what he wants until the family is actually ordering.  Asking him to make up his mind while in line would harm his delicate sense of self, potentially scarring him for life.  For extra points, many moms will wait until precious little Billy has made up his mind and then suggest maybe he would like something else better:  But you always get chicken nuggets.  Wouldn’t you rather have a hamburger?  Lather, rinse, repeat.  The only thing which will convince these parents to speed the process along is if another cashier becomes free and the people behind them will no longer have to wait.

The rules don’t apply to me, my child is disabled.  Some kids have special needs;  we all get that.  But some parents take this understanding as an invitation to be irrational.  The neighbor down the street has a son who is deaf.  When we moved in she made it a point to visit with me to warn us of the risk that he wouldn’t hear us when we were driving through the neighborhood.  So far, just a concerned parent taking extra precautions.  But then we notice that she has set up a basketball hoop on the curb facing the street.  The only way her son can use it is to stand in the street next to a (busy enough) intersection while facing away from all traffic.  At one point she walked down the street on the sidewalk while her son rode his bicycle at a walking pace in the middle of the street.  I’m told she looked annoyed when my wife laid on the horn behind him.

The rolling road block.  I always picture this family as three generations all holding hands.  But in practice they are careful not to hold hands, because this would limit their ability to fully spread out while walking in a parking lot, crossing a street, or walking in a store.  Key to their strategy is to place the most indecisive member of the family in the leadership position.  This could be an aging grandparent, but works just as well with a 4 year old.  Age doesn’t matter, so long as they don’t have a plan.  Then the rest of the family fans out to make sure no one can get around them.  Some families will run faking plays where the 4 year old appears to be the leader and fakes right but then at the last minute granny or mommy turns left.  When this play is properly executed, half of the family briefly follows the false leader and then mills around in feigned confusion for  a while before rejoining the herd.  Toddlers are best employed in the cleanup position, waiting until the rest of the family has finally cleared out of the way before deciding to join them.  Remember, don’t cross in between the toddler and their inattentive parents;  this would be rude.

Your kids are my babysitter.  This is a special variation on the world is my babysitter, but worthy of separate mention.  These parents watch with delight while their children place their hands on your very young child’s face.  Your asking them not to do this or moving your baby out of reach is considered extremely rude by these parents.  Once at an airport my wife had to remove a young girl’s hand which was covering our 1 year old daughter’s mouth and nose.  The father was outraged.  Evidently his daughter wanted to see what would happen if our daughter couldn’t breath.

If you keep acting up, I’m going to have to buy you a toy.  There are many variations on this theme, but all of them involve a parent who loudly tells their child not to do something and then never follows through.  When our daughter was three my wife was shopping with her at Target.  A boy around 4 or 5 years old was playing with the phone reserved for associates.  His mother told him repeatedly that if he didn’t put it down she wouldn’t buy him the DVD he had picked out.  After a while our daughter observed “He won’t get the DVD now because he didn’t listen to his mommy”.  The little boy was horrified and ran off.  My wife bought her a special toy that day.

Your mouth is writing checks your ass can’t cash.  This is a similar parent to the one immediately above, but instead of coming across as pushovers they come across as bullies.  The child is constantly harangued with threats of what will happen to them if they don’t shape up, but no effective discipline is ever enacted.  When my wife and I were dating there was a family at the table next to us in a coffee shop where the father (or perhaps mother’s boyfriend) kept telling the boy at the table that his mouth was writing checks his ass couldn’t cash.  I could never tell if the kid really was acting up or not, but either way the man kept repeating the same phrase the entire time we were there.

About these ads
This entry was posted in Fatherhood, Manosphere Humor, Motherhood. Bookmark the permalink.

27 Responses to Top 10 most annoying parents

  1. sean says:

    What if my kids’ brought their own toys? My kids are very extroverted and love meeting other kids. Often they will get a group of kids playing that are in the waiting area. Yes, they will even play with kids at other tables close by after they have finished eating. I think it’s a shame when I see kids that are too scared to talk to another kid. I don’t understand, why go to a public place and be mad that you meet people? Or horrors of horrors other people actually try to talk to you or look at you. I can see your point on the other issues, you have to have a standard of behavior for everyone to have an enjoyable experience. And I don’t believe in leaving your kids for others to watch.

  2. Eric says:

    Parents with an entitlement mentality pass it on to their kids. Selfishness and narcissism is at the root of most of these parents’ attitudes; and of course, if you ask them, they’d swear their own kids were perfect (because they’re perfect parents, LOL)

  3. Dalrock says:

    @Sean
    How do you distinguish between the people who want your child sitting or standing at their table and those who don’t? Do you only turn your children loose when they are finished in fast food restaurants, or does this apply to sit down restaurants as well? The example you were responding to was at Apple-bees. Does that make a difference? Obviously we have different takes on this; I’m just curious how far we differ. Our daughter loves to meet new kids too, so when we go to fast food we usually pick one with a play area so she can play with the other kids.

  4. Legion says:

    The rolling road block.

    I’m familiar with this or it’s variant the oblivious standing roadblock. I’m very polite as I say ‘Excuse me.” as I knock into people. I don’t see why I should be inconvenienced for someone’s rudeness.

    Years ago when I was still married, my then wife, son and I were leaving Friendly’s. The waiting area had stacked up and everyone was in 2 lines to leave a lane for people to get out, except for one oblivious idiot. I was going to walk up and say excuse me, but that’s when I stopped putting up with rudenes. I walked through the guy, shoulder down, as I said excuse me. The ex smiling as I held the door open for her to leave and said she knew I did it deliberatly. She said he litterally bounced into the wall amongst his friends. I hope he learned situational awareness.

  5. sean says:

    If the restaurant provides kids menus and crayons for kids, then they are saying they are a kid friendly place. I don’t take my kids to places that don’t have those things. Even if the place has presented itself as kid friendly, I don’t let my kids sit at the bar if alcohol is served. So Applebee’s fits dead on in the kid friendly category. My kids have played with kids that share the back of the booth with us and they play with kids who are in the waiting area with us. I don’t allow them to talk w/ kids that are still eating or let them wander too far from my sight. Because my kids are outgoing they have learned to read signals as to whether another child is friendly or not. I also make sure I make eye contact with the adult at the table to see if they are okay with the interaction. For instance, recently in a subway, we were waiting in a line that went past the booths of people eating. There was a little boy sitting in another booth from his parents (the booths were 2 seaters). The little boy had an Army doll and my son happened to have his army planes with him. My son sat down. He and the little boy played with the doll and planes (they actually made up a pretty elaborate story) together. I made sure I made eye contact with the father and he was happy to see his son playing and occupied. I will admit I had to learn that you don’t go to a public place to have privacy. I am a natural introvert and don’t like to really draw any attention to myself or like people talking to me. However, I am married to an extreme extrovert and have gotten comfortable with the idea that whenever we go anywhere the waiter will sit down and talk to my husband, before we leave my husband will have been introduced to the manager and owner (if the owner is on the premises) and the whole staff will know my husband’s name and remember him if we ever come back (me not so much). So Dalrock, short answer if your table was close and my daughter tried to play with your daughter, I would look at you and if you didn’t look like you were okay with it, I would simply tell my daughter not to bother you. She would come back to the table and that would be the end of it.

  6. Stephenie Rowling says:

    This is very interesting take on parenthood from an American perspective.
    I’m mostly annoyed by parents that are constantly hovering over their kids and don’t let them try on the world on their own, with supervision of course, because in our cultures being surrounded by kids all the time is the norm and we consider it good no to mention that since we all will have kids, eventually is a bit of a “tit for tat”.
    I actually miss having a kids approaching me out of nowhere and ask me a question about something only they noticed, most of the times when a kid approaches me the parent is all over him take his/her out and apologizes I often have to say that I like children so they can let their kids get closer to me again and do whatever they were trying to do. Is kind of annoying frankly.
    Just wanted to comment in a different perspective from a kid friendly culture, the whole it takes a village to raise a child kind of approach.
    I will save this article make sure I won’t let my kids do any of this given that obviously in USA kids are more often an annoyance than a joy to be around. Of course it would be odd when they visit DR and see how welcomed they are everywhere, need to make sure to tell them “if they speak Spanish chances are they like you if they speak English proceed with caution”, YMMV.

  7. Opus says:

    Being the caring, friendly, person I am, I used to keep in my desk a few toy motor-cars. I would hand these to the children of my female clients who looked bored. I thought that this would amuse them whilst I talked to their mother. I quickly stopped doing this, as the children would rapidly tear the place up, and become bored seeking ever more toys, and becoming fractious. I noticed that the children who did not seem bored to begin with and whom I therefore did not hand toys too, would sit quietly and listen to their mother’s conversation with me. I am not sure whether this is nature or nurture.

  8. Dalrock says:

    @Sean
    I appreciate your clarification, and while we still have different takes I understand where our thinking differs much better now. Thanks!

    If the restaurant provides kids menus and crayons for kids, then they are saying they are a kid friendly place.

    At least around here, this describes the vast majority of restaurants (if you were to measure by number of meals served). Basically this describes any restaurant which is part of a relatively large chain, and to me it says “middle class”. Based on this, I would say you are assuming that the vast majority of people who go out to eat would appreciate your children at their table. If they don’t, you will judge them as unfriendly. I don’t think either assumption is a good one. The more kid friendly a restaurant is, the less likely they are to offer crayons and a menu to color to the kids. None of the fast food places do this, and they tend to have areas for kids to run around and/or play. The same with places like Chuck E. Cheese. The reason the bigger chains hand out crayons is it is expected that the children will sit quietly. Therefore they offer the child a quiet activity they can do while sitting. Most of the places which give kids crayons also serve beer, wine, and cocktails. So I don’t assume that when the server at Outback Steakhouse, or Red Lobster hands our daughter a kids menu and some crayons while asking if we want cocktails, that they are trying to signal that this is a good place for my child to roam around and hang out with other diners after they finish their food.

  9. Dalrock says:

    @Stephenie Rowling

    Just wanted to comment in a different perspective from a kid friendly culture, the whole it takes a village to raise a child kind of approach.
    I will save this article make sure I won’t let my kids do any of this given that obviously in USA kids are more often an annoyance than a joy to be around. Of course it would be odd when they visit DR and see how welcomed they are everywhere, need to make sure to tell them “if they speak Spanish chances are they like you if they speak English proceed with caution”, YMMV.

    I appreciate where you are coming from here. Your comment really got me thinking. The thing is, I really enjoy being around well behaved children. My wife is a teacher and now that she’s not teaching she really misses the time with other kids. I think there are a couple of factors which make what I’m talking about very different than the kinds of interactions you are used to in DR.

    1) The sorting process. The most dysfunctional families are the ones most likely to have their kids approaching strangers in the US. Not all of these kids come from dysfunctional settings, but they aren’t a random sample of US kids either. I mentioned the “you will understand when you have kids” refrain. The other part that often goes with that is “parenting is hard. They probably just need a break”. Likewise I’ve heard many parents say what a relief it is when their children run off to play. So you end up with mostly the kids of parents who need a break from their kids. As your comment suggests, the pleasant ones you wish would hang around a bit are the ones whose parents apologetically bring them back.

    2) It generally isn’t appropriate for strangers in the US to discipline kids who are roaming around.

    These two factors work very strongly together. The most disrespectful, difficult kids are the ones who are most likely to approach you, in a setting where you aren’t permitted to bring them back in line. Their own parents often don’t know how to control them and/or want to be around them, so as a stranger with absolutely no authority you are really at a disadvantage. As you said, this is very different in the US than it is in many other countries. One of the things my wife and I have noticed often when traveling overseas is how polite the children are to us. It would be very unnatural for most of them to give attitude to a stranger. Some would say this is because US children are just less polite. This may be true to a degree but again I think much of it is due to sorting. When I sold shoes in a department store or sold fish in an aquarium store, the kids who came in with their parents were generally very pleasant to interact with. The same goes when our daughter has friends over for a play date. Pleasant kids are a true joy to be around. Kids who are out of control aren’t.

  10. Stephenie Rowling says:

    “2) It generally isn’t appropriate for strangers in the US to discipline kids who are roaming around.”

    This is probably another key point. Kids are supposed to respect adults in our culture and adults can discipline a kid to a certain extent or just tell their parents that their kids are misbehaving they will apologize and set the kid right. I think you are right about the sorting with parents that want their cake and eat it too. The kid will go away but if the adult they are bothering try to tell them to stop doing something inappropriate they probably will break hell, “children will be children” is usually not encouraged in my country. Children can be around but there are rules they need to follow nevertheless.

  11. sean says:

    We definitely have different definitions of upscale. If you look at the commercials for the places you mentioned, they don’t show shots of people sedately eating in their respective booths. The commercials all promote an atmosphere of exuberance and interaction. Why go to restaurants that actively promote themselves as “the neighborhood place” or “it’s a party in here” if you want no interaction? Now, Ruth Chris, Emerils and another restaurant here called Fishbones definitely do not have kid menus or present an image that they in anyway cater to kids, so I don’t bring my kids to those places. It’s strictly adult time when I go there. As far as judging, this whole thing started with you judging a child as out of control b/c they approached your daughter. You didn’t see the child as just a friendly child.

    [D: I didn't say upscale, I said middle class. But if I understand you correctly anyone who doesn't want your kids at their table should either stay home, or be prepared to spend a lot of money. I don't think you are accurate in your assumptions of other diners. Many of them just want to have a nice dinner out with their friends and/or family. Also, restaurants are trying to make everyone feel welcome. But they are hoping people will be polite and use good judgment.]

  12. Dalrock says:

    @Opus

    Being the caring, friendly, person I am, I used to keep in my desk a few toy motor-cars. I would hand these to the children of my female clients who looked bored. I thought that this would amuse them whilst I talked to their mother. I quickly stopped doing this, as the children would rapidly tear the place up, and become bored seeking ever more toys, and becoming fractious. I noticed that the children who did not seem bored to begin with and whom I therefore did not hand toys too, would sit quietly and listen to their mother’s conversation with me. I am not sure whether this is nature or nurture.

    I suspect this is the same sorting process I mentioned in my response to Stephenie. It would be an interesting experiment to give some of the kids who were waiting patiently a toy and see the result. It could be that offering any child a toy signals this is a playroom and not a place of business. It might also be that the quiet polite ones would be very appreciative and play quietly and politely.

  13. Cole says:

    @Sean

    I don’t exactly see those promotions show multi-table interactions, exurbance at tables, yes but between them? No, you usually don’t see that. Kids don’t need to interact with other kids at a restaurant, isn’t that what playgrounds are for? Do the world a favor, keep the joy of your kid to yourself.

    My favorite thing to do with kids who walk around a restaurant bothering people, is to just stand up and ask loudly who lost their kid. Publicly embarrassing and chastising these kinds of parents gets the point across.

    It’s funny though, every time you see I comment, it starts off with or contains, “My kids aren’t like that, or I’ not one of those parents”. Makes me laugh.

  14. I think it must be because we’re “older” parents, but my husband and I have absolutely no patience for most kids (ours, of course, are perfect). My kids have been essentially going to work with me since they were born, and they understand the value of good behavior and the consequences of poor behavior. They also understand that good behavior is the only option. Since when is it “just being a kid” to mouth off to adults, harass other children, hold up lines, etc. That’s called “just being a brat”, and it goes for their parents, too. We have fallen off the attachment parenting cliff into child idolatry.

    Rudeness and lack of situational awareness are issues with teenagers and twenty-somethings, as well, it’s not just littles. We were recently at an sro concert (I know, what were we thinking?), and people kept crashing through our group instead of taking the sidewalks through the venue that were in place just to avoid the necessity of walking through “people” areas. My husband and another man in our group started putting shoulders into everyone who tried to push past, even the women, and eventually they got the message. It’s good to associate with men with broad shoulders who aren’t afraid to use them. (One hipster couple reported them to security, who replied “don’t walk through there anymore”.)

  15. Stephenie Rowling says:

    Heh relevant cartoon about how kids had changed with the times: http://globalgreekworld.blogspot.com/2009/10/global-greek-humour-greek-education.html

  16. Eric says:

    Dalrock:
    I tend to agree with Stephanie here because children tend to reflect the attitudes of their parents. We live in an extremely anti-social, politically-correct, neo-puritanical culture where self-interest trumps everything else. Unsurprisingly, children are going to have the same self-righteous, self-serving attitudes.

  17. Kathy says:

    ” But if I understand you correctly anyone who doesn’t want your kids at their table should either stay home, or be prepared to spend a lot of money”
    Hey, come on Dalrock, that’s an unfair assumption.

    Sean said this in a prior comment.
    “So Dalrock, short answer if your table was close and my daughter tried to play with your daughter, I would look at you and if you didn’t look like you were okay with it, I would simply tell my daughter not to bother you. She would come back to the table and that would be the end of it.”

    I don’t think that she would expect you to stay home, now.. Really.

    I reckon you guys just see things a little differently, and will probably just have to agree to disagree. :)

    Eric makes a rather salient point here (in support of Stephenie’s comment) with which I agree.

    “We live in an extremely anti-social, politically-correct, neo-puritanical culture where self-interest trumps everything else. Unsurprisingly, children are going to have the same self-righteous, self-serving attitudes.”

  18. Iain D says:

    Playing with other kids is a tough ground to navigate. I tend to think that the more formal the atmosphere the less appropriate it is for the kids to intermingle. In other words, at McDonalds they can do what they want, at a $50 a plate dinner they had better sit their asses down.

    There is also the other side of the coin to consider: being too conscious of other parents. Just this last week I was out camping with my family and their friends. Between the 4 sets of parents (mine plus 3 others of about the same age) I had more advice than I knew how to handle.
    Generally I would let my son do what he wanted (he’s 7). He wanted to go to those kids on the beach and play with them? Go right ahead. Oh, they didn’t want to play? Well, go try another group, or have fun on your own and get other kids interested.

    As a relevant aside, last week my son asked a lady at the public pool why she had a robot leg (a prosthetic). It actually turned into a very educational lesson for him. The lady didn’t mind being asked at all, and told me she prefered it to kids being shushed around her.

    I will also say that I have disciplined kids who has crossed me, with no conflict from their parents. Sometimes this is right, like when they run across a bike path and I practically have to lay down in order to not kill them, other times it’s less immediate, like interupting or cutting in line. Whether this is a Canadian thing of not creating a fight has yet to be determined.

  19. bc says:

    The problem ‘the world is my babysitter’ is interesting to me because it is not international. At group gatherings in France (village fetes, etc.) kids do leave parents and self organize with the elder kids looking after the younger. There’s a lot more interest in other people’s kids in general. We’re Americans, and it is weird the first time your kids run off for the night but it quickly becomes awesome. Iain likely has it right that at fancy restaurants (or in Paris) the rules will be for less intermingling.

    Maybe there are social rules you have that others don’t. The menu one, for example. I might be annoyed with the parent doing that but that doesn’t mean it is wrong that they take their time. That seems equally an issue with my frustration as with their indulgence. Similarly for the rolling road block. What is the actual social rule they are breaking by moving like that? They’re a slower convoy and that can be frustrating, but what’s the fix?

    The gun one is scary. When you tell the folk that run the store of the safety issue how do they respond?

    @Iain D, I like your approach.

  20. JP says:

    I was surprised not to see this parent, which I encounter a lot:

    I am too weak to discipline my appalling little bully. This parent stands there and does nothing while their kid harasses your kid. If you confront them about it, they’ll sort of shrug and say, “oh well, what can one do, kids will be kids” or they’ll say something ineffectual to their kid that does not force the kid to stop bothering your kid. Some of these parents actually become aggressive with you for daring to argue that their monster should stop bothering your kid.

    This is sort of a variation on number nine (parent who loudly tells their child not to do something and then never follows through) except they weakly tell their kid to behave and then don’t follow through, and also the kid is not misbehaving “by itself” but actively doing something to your kid (e.g., throwing sand in the sandpit, or splashing water at the pool).

  21. Jennifer says:

    You’re classic Dalrock.

    [D: Thanks!]

  22. Ana says:

    I have another one. Parents trying to teach their tiny little kids how to swim in waterparks in the general area meant for grown ups. When a grown up floating in a tube drifts near them, they give a rude stare as if some one tresspassed into their private swimming pool. The idea of flaoting rafts is that they float aimlessly and sometimes bump into each other, We had recently been to a waterpark with a big wave-beach A guy was holding a 1 month old baby in a tiny tube in the deepest part were his feet couldn’t touch the ground. The higest wave at the point was about 20 feet. It was crowded, fat grown-ups were floating around and crashing into each other’s tubes. I couldn’t enjoy the ride because of that stupid guy who had put a tiny baby amidst such chaos. I even confronted him and got scolded.

  23. Jizz says:

    Unfortunately i dont believe many people realise the responsibility of “raising” your child.
    To place my point: I saw a show where a white american went to a japanese school. He worr a goofy hat and wanted to make them laugh in class. He entered the classroom making noise and acting like a clown. Not one kid laughed or feigned interest.
    School is for learning.
    Now I’m not japanese, but I’ve been to Japan… And don’t tell me they don’t know how to have fun. They just know when it’s appropriate.

    The fact is, whether your kid is introverted or extroverted, they need to know the difference between joining and intruding. There’s a difference between playing and annoying.

    People seem to think that because their child is this way/that way, or because their child is learning that it’s ok for them to do whatever. But then… Don’t you wonder why these japenese (as example, generalised) kids are smarter than yours? Your kid is learning how to count, theirs are learning how to calculate. They consistently come to North America with 90% averages. Their kids aren’t enslaved, they aren’t actually smarter… They’re better raised.

    To quote a applicable war quote by Publius Flavius:
    Few men are born brave; many become so through training and force of discipline.

    Note: There is also a difference between disciplining your child and bullying him; there is no better obedience than willing obedience. (Xenophon)

  24. Tom says:

    Do you need two new best friends?

  25. Pingback: P.E.T. Sounds | rational dad

  26. Mark says:

    #11) I am now a parent, so I KNOW what is best for everybody else. This person had a child, so now that they have their multiplication medal, they feel like they are the appropriate police and are entitled to scorn those around them in any venue about what conversations and actions constitute accept behavior in the presence of their pure little spoiled, snot-nosed monsters. They will march up to a kid working behind the counter at a bowling alley and lecture him about the appropriateness of a song playing on the jukebox that someone else paid to be played, because their kids are there. They will walk over to a table at a restaurant and begin to council a party on their conversation topic, which they would not have even heard unless they were being nosey, from across the room. They will even lecture other parents about their methods of raising their children, because God knows that they liken their child to the baby Jesus, and they are the Virgin Mary and Joseph… and boy oh boy do they love being martyred. They love putting themselves up on that cross and claiming that they are being victimized by the world, all while taking on the problems on the greater society to make it a more “family friendly” environment…. Well, if it is going to be “family friendly,” maybe you should calm down, mind your own business for a change, and focus on being friendlier, yourself, because it is YOUR child that is observing and coming to accept a confrontational attitude as acceptable behavior from you!

  27. I am 24yrs old in January I want to live a peacefull life without my mum and step father but they keep expecting me to except there help and support all because of my Disablity I also hate it when they include me in there garbage please let me know what I should do about this

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s